Commentary | 28 October 2005

The changing structure of the international economy

Mark Thirlwell argues that the fall of the Berlin Wall, together with technological innovation and economic liberalisation contributed to the birth of a new global economy. This new global economy has been distinguished by four characteristics: greater market integration; global reorientation; new rules of the game; and the rise of regionalism.This paper was published as chapter two in the conference publication Changing utterly? Australia's international policy in an uncertain age.Mark Thirlwell

  • Mark Thirlwell

Mark Thirlwell argues that the fall of the Berlin Wall, together with technological innovation and economic liberalisation contributed to the birth of a new global economy. This new global economy has been distinguished by four characteristics: greater market integration; global reorientation; new rules of the game; and the rise of regionalism.This paper was published as chapter two in the conference publication Changing utterly? Australia's international policy in an uncertain age.Mark Thirlwell

  • Mark Thirlwell