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Global Issues

Obama should try cricket, 'fore it all turns to ashes

An opinion piece by Dr Michael Fullilove, originally published in the Financial Times on 10 December 2008, on the use of a cricket metaphor for President-elect Barack Obama's foreign policy, was published in The Australian Financial Review on 18 December 2008.Australian Financial Review, 18 December

Obama ought to take up cricket

In an opinion piece in the Financial Times, Dr Michael Fullilove, Global Issues Program Director and a visiting fellow at The Brookings Institution, argues that there are several lessons about the international system that President-Elect Barack Obama could learn from cricket.Financial Times, 10

We'll have to vie for Obama attention

In an opinion piece in The Australian, Dr Michael Fullilove, Program Director Global Issues and a visiting fellow at The Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, argues that Australia will need 'sharp elbows and pointy ideas' to be heard in Washington.The Australian, 17 November 2008, p. 8

Australia position at the G-20

Dr Michael Fullilove and Dr Stephen Grenville contributed a comment about the forthcoming Washington G-20 meeting to an online forum hosted by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and the Brookings Institution. The forum is available here:www.thechicagocouncil.org/g20forumhttp://www.brookings.edu/

After Bush: how to repair US alliances

In an opinion piece in The Christian Science Monitor, Dr Michael Fullilove, Program Director Global Issues and a visiting fellow at The Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, argues that whoever wins the US presidential election, either candidate would need to work hard to reinvigorate America's

A world of policy differences

In an article in the News Review section of The Sydney Morning Herald, Dr Michael Fullilove writes that the foreign policies of the two US presidential candidates would not be as similar as some analysts predict.Sydney Morning Herald, 1 November 2008, p. 29

Why Kissinger should support Obama

In an article in The Daily Beast online magazine, Dr Michael Fullilove, Program Director Global Issues and a visiting fellow at The Brookings Institution in Washington DC, writes that neither candidate would be a foreign policy realist after Henry Kissinger's heart - but Obama would be closer to it

Picking the US winner

In an opinion piece in the Sydney Morning Herald, Dr Michael Fullilove examines the implications of the US presidential election for Australia's interests.Sydney Morning Herald, 23 October 2008, p. 15

Hawk vs talk: America foreign policy choice

In this op-ed published in the Financial Times on 7 August 2008, Dr Michael Fullilove describes the foreign policy choice facing Americans in the forthcoming presidential election (and how experts usually get this question wrong).Financial Times, 7 August 2008, p. 9

Rudd steps out into the world with elan

Dr Michael Fullilove, Program Director Global Issues at the Lowy Institute and a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, writes in an opinion piece in The Sydney Morning Herald on the foreign policy performance of the Rudd government in its first six months.Sydney Morning Herald

Right direction, wrong policy

In an opinion piece in The Australian Financial Review, Lowy Institute Professorial Fellow Warwick McKibbin argues that Garnaut's model for an emissions trading system neglects the international picture and has highly uncertain costs. Australian Financial Review, 7 July 2008, p. 63

Il neonazionalismo della diaspora

Dr Michael Fullilove published an article about the Chinese diaspora, entitled 'Il neonazionalismo della diaspora', in the Italian language publication Aspenia. Aspenia is published by the Aspen Institute Italia. Aspenia, Number 41, 2008, pp. 125-129

Smart power: exaggerating America decline

Michael Fullilove argues that reports of America's slide towards mediocrity in defence, the economy, politics and international relations are exaggerated, that America as a superpower continues to fascinate, and that it remains the creative capital of the world.This article also appeared in the St

Think tanks and foreign policy

On the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the founding of the Lowy Institute for International Policy, Executive Director Allan Gyngell writes, in a paper in the Institute's Perspectives series, on the role of think tanks in shaping Australian foreign policy and in strengthening Australia's voice

Chinese diaspora carries a torch for old country

In an opinion piece in the Financial Times, Michael Fullilove, Program Director Global Issues and Lowy Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington DC, argues that there is good evidence of a spike in diasporic feeling among overseas Chinese.The piece was republished in The Straits

Democrats need quick end to infighting

In an opinion piece in The Australian Financial Review, Michael Fullilove, Program Director Global Issues at the Lowy Institute and the Lowy Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, argues that the bitter nomination contest must be resolved soon to allow time for a strong tilt

Thinking security

On Thursday 19 March 2008 the Hon. Kim Beazley delivered the second annual Coral Bell Lecture in Canberra. The purpose of this annual lecture is to recognise those individuals who, in their professional careers, have been able to bridge the worlds of academe and international policymaking. The

Expats - time to use them wisely

In this opinion piece in The Sydney Morning Herald, Dr Michael Fullilove argues that Australia, with its large 'gold-collar' diaspora, is well positioned to benefit from the global trend towards the strengthening of diasporas.The Sydney Morning Herald, 18 February 2008, p. 11

Anglo-Saxon attitudes

Lowy Institute Visiting Fellow Owen Harries has published a review of a new book, 'God and Gold: Britain, America, and the making of the modern world', by Walter Russell Mead, in Foreign Affairs magazine. Foreign Affairs, January/February 2008

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