Wednesday 01 Apr 2020 | 13:48 | SYDNEY

Blogs and blogging

Tuesday linkage

Last week Mark Thirlwell asked if anyone has created benchmarks for what Australian trade with other countries ought to look like. Here\'s a Treasury paper that makes an attempt (in an aggregate sense, I\'m told, rather than country by country), and here\'s a University of Southern

Monday linkage

Time and distance are trade barriers: \'We estimate that each day in transit is equivalent to an ad-valorem tariff of 0.6 to 2.3 percent\'. (H/t Free Exchange.) How America\'s clean energy technology boom went bust. \'To arrive in Phnom Penh today is to encounter a city teeming with energy

Friday linkage

We\'ll have more on PNG soon, but meantime, keep an eye on ABC journalist Liam Fox\'s Twitter feed. One sign you\'ve made it as a world power: The Economist devotes a permanent weekly section to you. (Thanks Graeme.) The Asia Foundation\'s Steven Rood is going to be blogging regularly on The

Wednesday linkage

The official communique from this year\'s Australia UK Ministerial (AUKMIN) talks. Disgust is an important but under-appreciated human trait, and can be exploited to improve development outcomes. Behavioural traits also affect the way we use public transport. Thailand is backing a

Tuesday linkage

Russia has officially handed over a nuclear-powered submarine to India on a ten-year lease. A new Brookings paper throws light on the quality of Australian foreign aid. (Thanks Danielle.) Submarines and self-reliance: Ergas pushes back against Dibb and Brabin-Smith.* \'The one-child policy has

So long, and thanks for all the fish

Being a blogger often feels like going fishing. Every morning you cast your line out looking for something to catch and discuss. Some days there\'s lots of things about, sometimes nothing. Some days you try and catch a big fish to impress others (and usually miss), some days you put in a lot of

Friday linkage

Depressingly low levels of civic education in Australia. The gender gap in public support for military actions. An ambitious attempt to reform Pakistan\'s schools, central to the fate of the country. (H/t Browser.) A thorough satellite imagery analysis of the infrastructure supporting the

Thursday linkage

The Jericho Amendments: new Australian Public Service rules for the use of social media. (Thanks Jasmin.) Relevant to our recent discussion: how blog debate can stimulate academic research. It\'s an irrational preference, but voters are more likely to trust better looking political

Wednesday links

Rudd continues his Indonesia push: \'My generation has been lazy on Indonesia. Your generation has no alternative but to be energetic on Indonesia\'. US sending new helicopter drones to Afghanistan. Seven principles for arguing with an economist. (H/t Free Exchange.) A Washington

Tuesday linkage

Syria is already in a state of civil war. Asian leaders worry about the security of oil supplies in the Middle East. The state of realism in US foreign policy and academic research. A question I\'ve been wondering lately: is Britain still a great power? Moves are afoot for ASEAN to become a

Monday linkage

Luxury items are flowing into North Korea. (Thanks Malcolm.) One for your bookmarks — The New Atlantis: A Journal of Technology & Society. \'I was not aware that Australia was about to be invaded by Papua New Guinea, or by Indonesia\'. Lunch with Zbigniew Brzezinski. (Thanks

A partial defence of econoblogging

I\'m in complete agreement with Steve Grenville\'s overall point — there is precious little evidence to suggest that the US blog debate has done much to \'winnow out dodgy arguments or produce a policy consensus.\' But while that\'s probably pretty depressing for those who would like to

Friday linkage

A map of US drone strikes in Pakistan. Myanmar signs a ceasefire with Karen rebels and announced another prisoner amnesty. Julie Bishop speaks on the Australian Opposition\'s foreign policy. A return to Wukan, the Chinese village that rebelled. CFR\'s new preventative priorities survey, \'

Reader ripostes: Presidentialism and realism

Alex Burns and NAJ Taylor on realism below the fold, but first, Peter Layton on \'presidential\' foreign policy: Excellent summary by Michael of a chapter from his forthcoming book. I am concerned though of the seeming conflation towards the end of the blog piece of foreign policy with

Thursday linkage

\'We must clearly see that international hostile forces are intensifying the strategic plot of Westernizing and dividing China.\' Hu Jintao cranks out some old-school communist rhetoric, but who is the real audience? And what part of Western culture is the CCP worried about? A biography

Call for questions: Civil society in China

Using questions from you, Peter Martin and colleagues are conducting interviews for The Interpreter with Chinese academics and journalists. Previous installments in this series here and here. Next week, Nathan Beauchamp and I will conduct an interview for The Interpreter with Jia Xijin,

Wednesday linkage

North Korea from 30,000 feet: Satellite photos and analysis by two of the very few Westerners to have ever seen North Korea\'s nuclear facilities. (Thanks Janice.) What motivates someone to become a war photographer? (Warning, graphic images.) Nationalism and realism: kissing cousins? A 360&

Whither realism?

In the links last week I highlighted a survey of US international relations (IR) scholars. One question particularly leapt out: \'Which of the following best describes your approach to the study of IR?\'. While a colleague has noted that you\'ll never hear the word \'constructivism\' inside the

Tuesday linkage

Japan hasn\'t declined as much as you might think, says Paul Krugman. Behind the scenes in the creation of the new US military strategic review. Meanwhile, Beijing\'s response to the document has been largely muted. Anwar Ibrahim has been freed to return to politics, but his time may have

Blogs and the US economic debate

Economists have certainly taken to blogging with alacrity. But this vigorous debate has done little to winnow out dodgy arguments or produce a policy consensus. Economists have a reputation for hedging their bets (\'on the one hand...on the other hand...\'). But in the current US macro debate,

Monday linkage

American blogger Milpundit responds to my post on the Pentagon\'s new strategy. An intrepid Russian breaks into an abandoned Soviet-era rocket motor factory and takes some glorious pictures. Africa: the violent repercussions of random border design. Monocle editor Tyler Brûlé

Reader ripostes: Centralisation of security policy

Two responses to Andrew\'s post on PMs and the national security apparatus. First Alex Burns and then Peter Layton below the fold: The Rudd Government\'s related foreign policy achievement was its 2008 National Security Statement which promised a regular NSS and budget. The Gillard Government

The third annual Madeleine Award

The American grand strategist George Kennan observed that much diplomacy is actually a form of theatre. On the international stage, nations strut, signal and stumble, seeking to win through bluster and brio rather than bribe and bash. And stepping again into that that world of diplomatic signs and

Friday linkage

The Pentagon\'s new strategic roadmap for the 21st century. Graeme Dobell reckons Jack Shafer is one of the best in the business when it comes to hacks writing about hackdom. For a taste, here is Shafer on one of the perennials: the commonalities between reporting on sport and the race to become

Thursday linkage

Our thanks to environmental researcher and blogger Roger Pielke for including The Interpreter in his 2011 awards. Two think tanks look at what\'s ahead for Southeast Asia in 2012: CFR and CSCAP. Following Sam\'s post yesterday, China may struggle to boost its global cultural status.

Wednesday linkage

The Economist on the role of blogs in America\'s contemporary economic debate. Where are the best places (in the US) to study international relations? Why Gulf countries are becoming more concerned about food security. Buy, Build or Steal: A major new study on China\'s quest for advanced

Thursday linkage

The Economist charts Christmas spending levels around world. (H/t Peter Martin.) Terrific collection of urbanism links over at The Melbourne Urbanist. Deep knowledge of a country may not make you better at diagnosing its problems. (H/t Sullivan.) Taiwan\'s NMA TV marks the death of

Reader riposte: Big and little truths on uranium

Richard Broinowski writes: My apologies for getting some details wrong in my broadside about pro-nuclear bias at Lowy, and to those I might have offended. But none of the corrections weaken my general observation, which Peter Burnett strengthens: blog postings are ephemeral, whereas the

TechCamp technology linkage

TechCamp Bucharest was all about showcasing some brilliant new technologies. It brought together and focused on NGOs trying to improve their governments but a lot of the tools have applications for businesses, students and individuals. Here are some of my favourites: Frontline SMS are

Wednesday linkage

While the world watched North Korea, the first India-US-Japan trilateral talks were held. Foreign Policy lists 2011\'s most bone-headed prognosticators. Iran\'s currency plummets. What\'s it like to be a blogger in the Gulf Arab States? The US cuts its aid budget. (Thanks Danielle.) Linda

Tuesday linkage

Submissions are now open for the \'Australia in the Asian Century\' White Paper. An issue paper is now out. Using technology to fight corruption. (h/t Sullivan.) Paul Krugman asks, \'Will China break?\' To balance your diet of Hitchens remembrances, two less flattering accounts from

Monday linkage

Does Hedley Bull\'s \'The Great Irresponsibles?\' label apply to the US and China today? PNG\'s political crisis explained. On the same blog, also check out this enlightening Twitter exchange. The escalating violence in Egypt. Raoul Henirichs answers questions from Diplomat readers about

Friday linkage

This will be the last post for today, as the Lowy Institute is heading out for its Christmas party. See you Monday. Australia\'s Gen-Y is beginning to engage with Asia in arts, fashion and farming. Building a Concert of Asia, with China. (h/t @RoryMedcalf.) Gaining attention at the

2011: Rise of the machines

While 2011 showed the power of the mob, both overthrowing Middle East dictators and catapulting China into great power status, the year was also one where machines increasingly shaped world politics. Three examples: Machines instead of workers: as Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

Reader riposte: Lowy nuclear debate

Richard Broinowski writes: I was incredulous to read Sam Roggeveen\'s assertion that Lowy is committed to open and unemotional debate on nuclear issues, and also that it is a non-partisan think tank rather than a lobby group. In a number of important respects it is neither open nor impartial,

My books of the year

I\'m afraid not many of my best reads of 2011 were actually published in 2011, mainly because the backlog of books I simply must read lengthens with each passing year. I guess that\'s why they invented retirement. But enough preamble. Subversion as Foreign Policy: The Secret Eisenhower and

Thursday linkage

Wukan, a Chinese fishing village, is in open revolt. Speaking of which, Time\'s Person of the Year is The Protester. Gareth Evans says Malcolm Fraser is right to worry about proliferation, but that\'s no reason to leave India out in the cold. The Economist reports on an eyebrow-

Wednesday linkage

Google has taken its street-view cameras 44,000km through tsunami-devastated Japan. (H/t RCW.) A decade after the terrorist siege, security at India\'s parliament is much improved. As for what goes on inside the building... Great idea from the BBC: top economists reveal their graphs of 2011.

Tuesday linkage

Beijing\'s air pollution goes off the charts. We may have linked to this one before, but it\'s worth highlighting again: The University of Hong Kong\'s China Media Project. Inside Saddam\'s regime: new tapes help shed light. Joseph S Nye on Obama\'s Asia pivot. Thirteen foreign policy

Monday linkage

Add Aceh to James Brown\'s list of 2012 elections, though a dispute about election regulations threatens to undermine the poll and the peace process. Malcolm Fraser on why the Labor Party\'s India uranium reversal is wrong. The latest issue of Global Asia has a series of articles on the

Friday linkage

Some fascinating detail about American intelligence cooperation with Pakistan. More on Vietnam: the Overseas Development Institute has been tracking Vietnam\'s remarkable economic progress. (Thanks Ryan.) North Korea turns north. (Thanks Malcolm.) Another data point on India\'s faltering

Thursday linkage

A useful list of prominent Southeast Asian bloggers. Stephen Walt on \'Offshore Balancing\', which Peter Beinart suggests is the real \'Obama Doctrine\'. Weapons don\'t make war. The US Navy will use chicken fat for fuel as part of its \'Green Fleet\' plan. One sign of rising nationalism?

Wednesday linkage

Kenneth Rogoff: Is modern capitalism sustainable? What\'s on the label: product packaging and nationhood. The deterioration of India\'s economy is under-reported: Tyler Cowen points to this article. Could the Australian model of federation be the right one for Europe? Interview 

Tuesday linkage

North Korea has changed a lot in the last twenty years. Then again: a Dutch stamp collector arrested in North Korea on espionage charges was treated more or less how you would expect. An early response to my call for Vietnam-related material: Andrew Butcher from the Asia New Zealand

Friday linkage

The next president of Iran? What would it take to end India\'s Maoist insurgency? The politics of the Thailand flood. Regular Interpreter contributor Andrew Selth has a new paper out about Burma and WMD. The origins and emergence of \'Indo-Pacific\'. The Crisis Group on ending Myanmar\'s

Through Chinese eyes: He Wenping (part 3)

Armed with your questions, Peter Martin and David Cohen from Sinocentric speak to the Director of African Studies at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, He Wenping. Part 1 here; part 2 here. Frances: How does China view its relationship with and approach to Libya now? How have China\'s

Thursday linkage

Saudi Arabia stops claiming it will (can?) increase its oil supply. Finally, a use for Segways: target practice dummys. The National Interest\'s blog on Obama\'s clumsy China containment policy. Here comes the Thatcher boom: the Meryl Streep biopic will be out soon, and biographer Charles Moore

Wednesday linkage

Extraordinary piece of reporting on China\'s organ harvesting racket, with the organs coming from executed prisoners. Paul Pillar summarises new Brookings Institution polling of Arab public opinion. Africa has made remarkable economic and political progress in the last decade. How? The

Tuesday linkage

Foreign intervention in Syria is less unthinkable than it used to be. All flesh is grass: the Air Force\'s beloved F-111s are now landfill. Foreign Policy\'s top 100 global thinkers for 2011. (Thanks Michael.) Twenty Clicks: \'carefully chosen links to top Indian news stories, updated

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