Saturday 30 May 2020 | 06:05 | SYDNEY

Blogs and blogging

Tuesday linkage

Kings of bling: China is a booming market for luxury goods. Deforestation a big problem in North Korea. Congratulations to Tobias Harris, with his Observing Japan blog turning three. OJ has been a big part of my education about modern Japanese politics, and judging by Tobias' media appearances

Friday linkage

Good news for coal: a new report says China is ripe for underground carbon storage. The Indian Government is bailing out the national airline. Long Esquire article about the unmanned-aircraft revolution in the US Air Force. (H/t Dewline.) John Quiggin is dead right — the Government's

Thursday linkage

South Korea is building itself a more than respectable navy. Reductio ad absurdum of the American declinism thesis: Russian professor predicts end of US by 2010. India's people's car, the Tata Nano, launched with much fanfare last year, is a huge hit. Gripping narrated slideshow offering a

Blogging at home and abroad

The Lowy poll results on how Australians get their news about international events was certainly sobering for those of us working in online media, but how does that figure look compared to polling from overseas? To recap the Lowy poll result, we asked where people get their international news,

Wednesday linkage

Singapore is catapulting its way out of recession, according to Business Week. How the Chinese media observed North Korea during Wen Jiabao's recent visit. Also on the DPRK, there's a construction boom in Pyongyang. According to Peter Martin, the theory espoused by this year's winners of the

Tuesday economics linkage

The 2009 Nobel Prize in economics (aka 'The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2009') has gone to Elinor Ostrom and Oliver E Williamson. Mark Thoma provides links to some initial reactions. Ken Rogoff wonders when China will realise that it cannot

Lowy Poll: Australians and new media

The 2009 Lowy Institute Poll was launched today. It's the fifth annual Lowy Poll, which surveys a nationally representative sample of Australians about international issues. There is a lot in this year's poll, from climate change to Afghanistan to China and the US. One area that might get missed

Tuesday linkage

The Economist has a special feature on Indonesia. The piece on 'Chindonesia' looks interesting. My recent post about the ADF's future role in disaster relief implied climate change was increasing the threat of extreme weather events. But maybe we've overestimated that threat. The ABC's Off Air

Monday linkage

The Dutch parliament sends a strong signal to government that it wants troops out of Oruzgan province. Activism to prevent child labour make actually make the problem worse. The lot of foreign actors in China. For North Korea wonks, a new blog: North Korea Leadership Watch. China has

Friday linkage

Re. my rule of thumb ('the more that police uniforms resemble military uniforms, the less democratic that country is likely to be'), check out these photos from Dili. The Asia Foundation says Thailand's democratic political culture goes deeper than many think. Terrific info-graphic summing up

Thursday linkage

A survey of the dominant social media networks in Southeast Asia. Obama's Asia itinerary for November: Tokyo first. The Financial Times on the new age of rail. China's banks are having a good crisis. Amazon's Kindle electronic book reader is to be released in Australia, meaning technology may

Wednesday economics linkage

In the New Yorker, Ryan Lizza has a lengthy piece on Larry Summers and the White House economic team. Brad DeLong on why modern macroeconomics needs to reconnect with economic history. Dan Drezner draws our attention to his new piece assessing China’s financial power. Vanity Fair has a

Wednesday linkage

With the Tamil Tigers defeated, the Sri Lankan government steers infrastructure spending toward former war zones. The latest issue of Foreign Policy carries an article arguing the election of the DPJ in Japan is a less radical change than many think. Tobias Harris strongly disagrees, saying

Monday linkage

Further to Malcolm's post about Rudd's reticence toward the Dalai Lama, President Obama is running for the hills too. Also via Passport, a new Index of African governance. Crikey has a new group blog on Australian politics, The Stump. Rupert Murdoch's biographer on what Murdoch doesn't

Friday linkage

Colin Heseltine shares his thoughts on Prime Minister Rudd's Asia-Pacific community idea – not good reading for the Government. Good grief: Ireland's economy due to shrink by 12% this year. Of 33 nations surveyed, Australians are the most admiring of their own country. (H/t Peter Martin.)

Thursday linkage

Russia postpones its census on cost grounds. Meanwhile, did you know the CIA recently revised its Afghanistan population figure downward by 16%? There's been no census there since 1979. New Mandala links to an SMH piece about the quality of Sydney's Thai food. What has struck me as someone

Wednesday linkage

Further to my William Safire post, here's the speech he wrote for Nixon in case Neil Armstong and his crew got stuck on the moon. Relegation syndrome: explaining the strange ebullience of the UK Labour Party conference. For the nuclear wonks, the Federation of American Scientists has a round-

Tuesday linkage

Pigeons detained and screened as Beijing leaves nothing to chance in National Day celebrations showcasing its military might. The White House gets a scoop on the Spanish PM's daughters.   The 'pugnacious contrarian' and Nixon speech writer William Safire dies. Al Jazeera's 101 East takes an

Monday linkage

A speech by the original and interesting Clay Shirky on the decline of traditional media. 'Phone-a-friend' moves into development: Question Box allows people without access to the Internet to phone up those who do, to ask them questions. Via Andrew Sullivan — letters of note. 'Life imitates

Thursday linkage

Gordon Brown preparing to announce cut-backs in the UK's nuclear-missile submarine fleet? A British Tory MP reflects on the perpetual dilemma of 'dirty hands' in foreign policy. Thanks to Hans for the link. Participants in China's National Day Parade given official instructions on how to, umm

Wednesday linkage

A short video from The Atlantic on Chinese internet censorship and what it means for doing buisiness there. Welcome signs of sanity in the Obama Administration's Afghanistan policy. Easy on that nation-building rhetoric, Kevin, you might get left behind. The Asia Foundation's National Survey

Tuesday linkage

Goldman Sachs says the economy of a reunified Korea could be larger than France and Germany by the middle of this century. The Brookings Institution launches a blog, of sorts. Superb photo essay of preparations for China's National Day parade on 1 October. The King Abdullah University of

Monday linkage

The author of When China Rules the World explains what that world will look like. The Hatoyama Government's early moves look promising. Will Japan's change of government bring a change to its Burma policy? Europe is ill-prepared for its own international decline. The Guardian claims it has a

Friday funny: Poemtry

The Interpreter has raged against the bureaucratisation and formulaic phrasing that the English language is increasingly falling victim to. So it was refreshing to see some of the creative phrases and idioms that have emerged in China. Sadly, many of the best and most colourful signs in Shanghai

Friday linkage

Inner City Press, a quirky reported blog that covers the UN beat, questions former Foreign Minister and now UN Cyprus envoy Alexander Downer about a possible conflict of interest. NY Times columnist David Brooks gets to the heart of modern America in a way few other observers do. This one's a

Thursday linkage

Kim Beazley will be Australia's next Ambassador to Washington, DC. The potentially radical economic consequences of China's demographic crunch. The Stern Hu case will have 'absolutely nil impact on Chinese investment in Australia', says one industry analyst. Arms Control Wonk has a scoop,

Wednesday linkage

World War 3 has already happened, taking 5.4 million lives in a decade. The reason you've heard nothing about it is because it took place in central Africa. (H/t WPR.) As The Age says, Obama's endorsement of the G20 is good news for Rudd. Rudd will also be encouraged that Obama is chairing the

Monday linkage

Chances are, you never even knew his name: the man who saved more lives than anyone, ever, has died. Last week we mentioned the failure of 'One Laptop per child'. Here's a reply from the founder of the initiative. Causes of the crisis: a new blog examines the entrails of the GFC. Walter

Thursday linkage

An update on the story I mentioned yesterday, about GQ burying its own scoop about the 1999 Moscow bombings. Here's an interview with the journalist who wrote the piece (h/t Real Clear World). An examination of 9/11 terrorist Mohamed Atta's Master's thesis in urban planning. Why 'One laptop

Wednesday linkage

'If they can put a man on the moon, then...' Barack Obama actually used this logic to explain how the US would tackle climate change. Larvatus Prodeo explains why its makes no sense. Contra my post, here's why Rupert Murdoch's paywall idea might work after all. GQ recently published an article

Tuesday linkage

Have we overestimated the size of our education exports sector? The India-Pakistan nuclear deterrence relationship resembles MUD rather than MAD. Japan's enduring soft power: Samurai mind training in the US military. Via Marginal Revolution, the IMF's new blog. President Lula says Brazil will

Monday linkage

British PM Gordon Brown's latest speech on Afghanistan policy. US-China talks aimed at developing some rules around 'incidents at sea' are not going well. Here's the story behind the Hatoyama essay I analysed last week. Turns out he may not have written it himself, and his office were

Friday linkage

Understanding Japan's elections: Video of a panel discussion with Kurt Campbell, Michael Green, Steve Clemons and Bob Schieffer. What to expect from the big 1 October Beijing military parade. Sceptical environmentalist Bjorn Lomborg backs geoengineering as the best response to climate change

Thursday linkage

Timor-Leste: Global Dashboard points out an editorial in the Jakarta Post praising the statemanship of Gusmao and Ramos Horta. Also on Timor, this piece asks why it is one of the world's highest per capita aid recipients. John Howard backs Rudd's China diplomacy, but blasts him on Japan.

Wednesday linkage

A post-fossil-fuel economy: a calm look at the numbers. Re. yesterday's Lance Joseph post about the Balibo Five, Scott Burchill writes to recommend this alternative timeline. Using satellite imagery to measure economic growth. Five years on, how has Australian agriculture fared as a result of

Tuesday linkage

Ajay Chhibber, Director of the UN Development Program for Asia and the Pacific, on the effects of rising oceans for the Pacific Islands. We noted Norway's trenchant criticism of UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon some time ago. Ban has responded...diplomatically. The Economist interviews Jim

Monday linkage

Arms Control Wonk says that, contrary to media reports like the one we carried, Iran's uranium centrifuge program is not slowing down. Obama called the Afghan election 'an important step forward'. But fraud allegations are rife and perhaps only 35% of voters turned out. Deflation in Thailand?

Friday linkage

The David Rothkopf piece on US State Department reform which Fergus wrote about on Tuesday brought a heated response from Foreign Policy. Here's Rothkopf's reply. A report we carried yesterday that Russia is buying French warships might have been a little premature. The PNG-Irian Jaya

Thursday linkage

For the first time since World War II, Russia is buying foreign warships. They're ordering one and perhaps up to five French helicopter carriers of the same class that lost out to the Spanish design for Australia's amphibious ship contract. (H/t Information Dissemination.) The Beeb has a scoop

Wednesday linkage

The Peak Oil fallacy: oil is abundant and likely to go down to $30 a barrel. Not so, says the Economist's Free Exchange blog. More counter-arguments at The Oil Drum. Further to Fergus' post on new US State Department appointments, 'Smart power' author Suzanne Nossel has also signed up. South

Tuesday linkage

More competition in the education market: the Canadian International Council calls on Canada to start tapping the Indian student market. A new ASPI Analysis from Andrew Selth: readers will be familiar with some of his arguments from previous posts. Long-suffering Sydney public transport users

Monday linkage

Indonesia: an assessment of 'one of the most ambitious decentralization programs of modern times'. Global infant mortality has halved since 1960. More good news here. (H/t Sullivan.) Asia Security Initiative is sceptical about a report (which I, among many others, have cited) of extremist

Friday linkage

I'm told that at ANU's Burma Update Conference earlier this week, rumours were flying that East Timor plans to be the first country to accord full diplomatic recognition to Burma's 'government in exile', the National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma. Those who would dismiss the idea

Thursday linkage

UPDATE: Yesterday I wrote about South Korea's upcoming satellite launch, but the launch has been delayed, perhaps for political reasons. Steve Clemons of the Washington Note has a long post about the latest Australian American Leadership Dialogue which begins with him insisting that the

Wednesday linkage

More satellite imagery analysis of that Burmese box. It's very unlikely to be nuclear-related. If you like blog wars, they don't come any more high-powered than this: Krugman, Fallows, Ferguson...and Felix the Cat. Readers may be getting tired of me pointing out this kind of thing, but nowhere

Monday linkage

India outraged as Bollywood star held at US airport: at last, something to occupy the Indian press that does not involve Indians studying in Australia. A visit to Dimona: Bibi Netanyahu sends some none-too-subtle signals. Remember the global he-cession? But if men are bearing the brunt of this

Wednesday linkage

The International Energy Agency expects Peak Oil by as early as 2020. Barack Obama's reading list. Netherland is definitely on my want-to-read list. Nouriel Roubini surveys the bright spots amid the global economic downturn. (H/t Drezner.) Visually, the site is a mess, but Inner City Press 

Tuesday linkage

Japan's election campaign starts in a week, and the polls look good for the opposition. In the midst of much gloom about Japan's long-term future, these stats about R&D spending look encouraging. Pushback on my Afghanistan pessimism: readers recommended I read this and this. A small victory

Monday linkage

According to Juan Cole, the most important news out of Pakistan has nothing to do with terrorists and drone strikes. It's all about the Supreme Court, and it's good news. (H/t Democracy Arsenal.) Andrew Bacevich asks, 'What is it about Afghanistan, possessing next to nothing that the United

Thursday linkage

On Hiroshima Day, it is worth remembering that humankind has made great progress of late in the way it conducts warfare. But a Chinese invasion of Taiwan would be deadly, and RAND thinks China now has a fair chance of prevailing. According to the WSJ, the Bill Clinton-Kim Jong Il agenda was

Pages