Saturday 30 May 2020 | 06:23 | SYDNEY

Blogs and blogging

Wednesday (mostly China) linkage

James Fallows on the Google decision: China enters its Bush-Cheney phase. CFR's Asia blog adds important details to the Google story: 1. Secretary Clinton is due to give a major speech on internet freedom on 21 January; and 2. It looks like google.cn is now displaying uncensored search returns

Wednesday security linkage

What is the Royal Australian Navy going to use its great big strategic projection ships for? Are they as much for the Army as the Navy? Go to the Seapower 2010 conference to find out.  It's a bad sign for the supposed ruddy health of the Australia-US alliance that the 2007 bilateral defence

Tuesday linkage

I recently blogged about the geopolitical implications of the electrification of road transport. But a Boston Consulting Group report says don't hold your breath for electric cars. Cyber-security: the South Korean military is banning the use of USB drives. Sensible stuff from Tony Abbott,

Monday linkage

The Asia Foundation surveys regional attitudes about the economy in 2010. The Lowy Institute's own Raoul Heinrichs writes on Asian regional architecture for the Asia Security Initiative blog. The Obama Administration has agreed to sell Patriot missiles to Taiwan, but F-22 fighters should also

Friday linkage

Foreign policy analyst Stephen Walt celebrates his first anniversary of blogging: '...writing this blog has forced me to connect more with the blogosphere itself, which I see as a revolutionary development in mankind's collective conversation.' He also has some choice words for academics who look

Thursday linkage

The Peterson Institute for International Economics examines the rationale behind Pyongyang's recent currency revaluation. The quality and quantity of China's scientific research is catching up with that of the US. Japan's Finance minister resigns due to ill health. CFR president Richard

Monday linkage

So, it's 2010 and The Interpreter is back after an 11-day break. Let's see, what did we miss? This important piece actually pre-dates Christmas, but I only just spotted it: 'How do I know China wrecked the Copenhagen deal? I was in the room.' Very cool infographic on global carbon emissions

Wednesday linkage

The 50 best news photos of the decade. Highly recommended. Judah at World Politics Review has been inspired by our 'Things I've changed my mind about this year' feature. Indonesia orders Chinese anti-ship missiles. (H/t Nosint.) Now that post-tsunami reconstruction is winding down, Aceh's

Tuesday linkage

UK monthly Prospect names its top public intellectuals of 2009, with economist Simon Johnson on top. I know my colleague Mark Thirlwell rates Johnson's Atlantic piece on the financial crisis very highly. Sending a single US soldier to Afghanistan for a year costs US$750,000 or more. Further

Monday linkage

Japanese Prime Minister Hatoyama's personal views on the Futenma marine base issue, the single biggest issue in US-Japan relations at the moment. The converging worlds of journalism and think tanks. Thanks to World Politics Review for alerting me to news that Vietnam is buying a fleet of new

AFP must now act on war crimes

The NSW Supreme Court on Friday handed down a striking judgment in the case of Daniel Snedden. In his defamation case against Nationwide News (publisher of The Australian) for an article the newspaper published entitled 'Serbian death squad commander alive and well and teaching golf in Perth', 

Friday linkage

I'm over a month late to this but, for the record, the Council on Foreign Relations now has an Asia blog. Bangkok Pundit reads a New York Times article on the sad state of the Mekong River and asks whether the Mekong River Commission is doing its job. But as Milton Osborne argued on Tuesday,

Wednesday linkage

Westpac's notorious 'banana smoothie' video made no mention of how tariffs might affect the cost of bananas, but they certainly influence prices in Europe. NY Times columnist David Brooks calls Obama's Nobel speech 'the most profound of his presidency, and maybe his life.' Via Russia Blog,

Tuesday linkage

The London Times claims to have Iranian documents proving secret work on a nuclear trigger device. Arms Control Wonk has analysis. The original document and an English translation are available here. Terrific piece by the New Yorker's Evan Osnos on China's 863 program, a massive clean energy

Monday linkage

A Korean view of Prime Minister Rudd's Asia Pacific community. 'The soft power of multilateralism has increased'. A Chicago Council report on the implications of the financial crisis for soft power in Asia. Russia's economy literally decimated by the global financial crisis. America's slow

Friday linkage

The Economist discusses the International Energy Agency's prediction of Peak Oil by 2020. How much information do Americans consume each day, and where do they get it from? It seems TV is still king. China's biggest carmaker looks to India. But there's a consumption boom at home too. In

New blogs of the year

And when I say 'new', I mean new to me. Here are some gems I've discovered in 2009 that I visit regularly, and which could come in handy for you too: Walter Russell Mead: An accomplished historian who blogs in a personal an anecdotal way you won't find in his books or articles. Mercifully, he

Wednesday linkage

Nice piece by Mark Colvin about Australia's eighth Prime Minister, Stanley Bruce, and his service to Australia overseas. Afghanistan, graveyard of cliches. Thanks to Will for the link. 'There is a persistent belief in Washington that the old, familiar ties with Japan's security policy community

Monday linkage

Evgeny Morozov on how the internet helps dictators. Morozov also has a blog. Shanghai Scrap recommends this blog as the one to follow for analysis of what China is up to in Copenhagen. Shanghai authorities want residents to stop wearing pajamas in public. If governments are going to waste

Friday linkage

Iran's threat to build ten more uranium enrichment sites might actually be its way of coming clean about existing secret facilities. On the other hand, Iran's announcement that it wants to enrich uranium to 20% purity is just really bad news. Did you know there's a civil war going on among

Thursday linkage

China at the forefront of rapid growth in Asia's online audience. New Mandala has highlights of a new book claiming President Mahathir squandered RM100 billion. A sober and sobering column from the FT's Martin Wolf. Tackling climate change doesn't have to be expensive, he says, but it is 'the

Tuesday linkage

Pakistan's president has ceded control of the nuclear arsenal to the Prime Minister. Reports that North Korea has revalued and replaced its national currency. Why did the Burmese leadership decide, five years ago, to build a whole new capital in the middle of their country? Answers here. I've

Monday linkage

Andrew Carr didn't like Raoul Heinrichs' post about Obama's 'quiet humiliation' in China. James Fallows also saw an upside to the visit — just scroll down his blog for lots of posts. African leaders advise Bono on reform of U2. This post summarises the findings of a new World Bank Report

The ultimate political backdrop

Politicians go to such lengths to get the perfect political backdrop for interviews. But has Sarah Palin set a new standard with this tranquil turkey slaughter scene

Thursday linkage

Obama is heading to Copenhagen with promises of emissions cuts of 17% off 2005 levels by 2020 — but he'll miss the final negotiations where any deals will be struck. Happy Thanksgiving to our American readers. FP gives you five things to be thankful for. US troop announcement for Afghanistan

Wednesday linkage

The Economist's weekly cartoon has a suggestion for the 2040 Climate Change Summit: a wave-lapped Mount Everest. United Russia held a two-day pow-wow with the Chinese Communist Party in October 'to glean information and know-how from Beijing’s authoritarian political and economic model' but

Tuesday linkage

The US-China Economic and Security Review Commission releases its 2009 Report to Congress. Another 60th anniversary. This one should pass with a little less fanfare than the one in China. The International Criminal Court is due to commence its second trial covering its investigation in the DRC

Friday linkage

Excellent op-ed by Tim Lindsey on domestic political ructions in Indonesia. He says SBY's decision to cancel his Australia visit had nothing to do with asylum seekers. Kuwait is the most corrupt Gulf state. Cell phone waiting area: ABC correspondent Lisa Millar reports on a neat innovation at

Thursday linkage

The WSJ says the recent discovery of large quantities of water on the moon could transform space exploration. Diplomatic Courier says there are strategic implications too. Just to even out our coverage of the Joint Strike Fighter, here's an ASPI paper from last year arguing the aircraft is

Wednesday linkage

Canada has suffered heavy casualties in Afghanistan, but infantry recruitment is booming. Two pieces about Obama and China to read alongside my effort from yesterday: Hugh White says Obama needs to do a Nixon, and Dan Drezner says the Administration is missing the boat on trade 'in a region

Tuesday linkage

Steve Coll asks, 'what if we fail in Afghanistan?' Mark Thirlwell recommends this post on 'the escalation game'. Why do people keep playing when it's in their interests to quit? Because they hate to lose.  A study which defines prosperity much more broadly than economic indicators ranks India

Monday linkage

TIME questions Obama's claim to be 'the first Pacific president' by pointing out that Reagan and Nixon both hailed from California. A related thought: I once heard it said that anti-China sentiment in America disspates as you travel from the east coast to the west. In case you missed it, a

Thursday linkage

The Jamestown Foundation on China's strategy for the Indian Ocean. Andrew Carr didn't like my post about Russia and oil. Much food for thought there — I might respond next week. One of Australia's competitors for the rights to the 2022 World cup is Qatar, which has just announced that,

Wednesday linkage

AIDS is the leading cause of death and disease among women aged 15 to 44. Via Fallows, a damning indictment of the RAAF's next fighter, the F-35. Is anyone (other than those financially committed to it) defending this aircraft? The myth of Chinese savings. You'd expect that globalisation and

Woody Allen explains the hyperlink

I gave a speech in Melbourne last week on 'New media and world politics' (video available soon on Slow TV). One of my arguments was that the internet improves accountability, in that it encourages writers to cite sources through hyperlinks. Because it's so easy to create links, readers tend to get

Tuesday linkage

The Human Security Report Project has a blog devoted to Pakistan. More ructions at Caijing magazine. Two data points on the fall of the Berlin Wall: first, the whole thing was precipitated by a fluffed line at a press conference; and second, westward emigration in fact began in Hungary some

Friday linkage

Cambodia pokes Thailand in the eye by making a rather unusual advisory appointment. Transcript of a recent speech by Professor James Cotton from the University of NSW to the Wilson Center on Australia's relations with great powers. Timothy Garton Ash reviews a slew of new books about the fall

Out of action

Sorry for the light posting, but I'm travelling today and my laptop has completely packed it in. Posting will be non-existent today and light tomorrow, and I'm unlikely to respond to emails today

Reader riposte: Subversive interns

A reader in China writes about our Twitter feed. A VPN, as I understand it, is a bit of kit that allows people in China to read the unfliltered internet. Without it, you're seeing the approved version: Am using a non-VPN internet connection for the first time in a while today, and thought the

Tuesday linkage

New pictures of Osama bin Laden? Readers have sent in more Middle East links: Ben recommends 'Aqoul, while Judah suggests the Middle East Institute's blog. Looks like the Wikipedia entry I complained about yesterday has been corrected. The system works! Last Friday I referred to the '

Monday linkage

Looks like Iran has rejected the enriched uranium deal. What do we do now? Renewable energy unlikely to be available 'on a sufficient scale to meet a useful fraction of our energy needs in the next two decades.' A provocative claim about NGOs: 'On climate, campaigners are unbelievably craven

Blogging the Middle East

A Canberra public servant writes to ask me which online sources I consult for coverage of Iraq and the Gulf states. My paltry links are below, but since that region is certainly not my specialty, let me put a call out for some crowdsourcing. What are some of the best English-language sites you

Friday linkage

The National Bureau of Asian Research has launched its annual Strategic Asia report. 'Defeated' Iranian presidential candidate Mir-Hussein Moussavi says his piece on the proposed multilateral uranium enrichment deal: he's agin' it. Taiwanese gamers are addicted to a Facebook app called 'Happy

Thursday linkage

Arms Control Wonk readers go to incredible lengths: one visited Syria and photographed the site of an alleged nuclear reactor. I always thought this was a crude cultural stereotype, but it turns out there really is a genetic predisposition that lowers tolerance for alcohol, and it's concentrated

Wednesday linkage

Yesterday I linked to an article arguing for a more human rights-centered approach to North Korea. Now here's the case for economic engagement. Cool! A 360 degree view of Beijing during the 1 October military parade. (H/t Peking Duck.) Via Greg Mankiw's blog, enjoy these examples of

Tuesday linkage

The Helsinki model: a case for a more human rights-centered diplomatic approach to North Korea. Via WPR, the 2009 Reporters Without Borders index of press freedom. How is Indonesia's democracy doing? East Asia Forum applies various measuring sticks. Later today, the Asia Foundation will launch

Monday linkage

China ready to talk to Taiwan about a trade deal. I never thought about it like this: 'The U.S. essentially is borrowing money from China for use to defend Japan from China.' Cool blog: Iconic photos. Speaking of photos, the NY Times does some exceptional photo essays, and this one on

Friday linkage

The US-China Economic and Security Review Commission has released a review of China's cyber-warfare capabilities. Australia is on the list of only 22 countries that are fully paid-up members of the UN. India and Indonesia to start negotiations on a free trade agreement. Historian and

Thursday linkage

A new Asia-focused e-zine is launched, with a rather fascinating financial model. China's space ambitions in pictures: they want an orbiting space station and a manned lunar mission. Kuwaiti women now have the right to a passport and to travel without spousal consent. Thomas Crampton's blog 

Wednesday linkage

The interns have taken over the Institute! Or at least, they are running our Twitter page. I expect to see Ashton Kutcher referencing us in no time. When the UN fired its envoy, Peter Galbraith, for speaking out about Afghan election fraud, it looked like the UN was ducking the issue. But

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