Wednesday 12 Dec 2018 | 16:39 | SYDNEY

News and Media

Facing up to an Asian future

Jane Fynes-Clinton, writing in The Courier-Mail on figures trickling in from the Census, which show the increasing number of Asians making up the Australian population, quotes the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy.

Why democracy is a victim of its own success

Writing in The Canberra Times on the blasé attitude of young people towards elected government, Benjamin Herscovitch quotes findings on the issue by the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll.

Panel discussion with Linda Jakobson on ABC Big Ideas

Is Australia caught between the USA and China? The challenge for Australia will be finding the right balance in relations with its key ally and its major trading partner. A discussion at the Noosa Longweekend Festival looked at the role of Australia in the middle of a global shift in economic, military and geopolitical power. Linda Jakobson, Program Director East Asia, spoke on the panel with Professor Alan Dupont, Peter Hartcher and Dr Paul Monk

PNG mobilises for a tech-savvy election

In an article in The Sydney Morning Herald on the impact of mobile telephony on the elections in Papua New Guinea, Hamish McDonald quotes Lowy Institute Research Associate Danielle Cave's post on The Interpreter.

Abbott gamble on cultural change

Writing in The Australian on the pivotal political issue of a carbon tax, Paul Kelly quotes the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy.

Resources boom overshadows Papua New Guinea vote

An article in The Jakarta Globe on the upcoming elections in Papua New Guinea while it is on the brink of a monumental resources boom quotes Annmaree O'Keeffe, acting Director of The Myer Foundation Melanesia Program, and Dame Carol Kidu, who delivered the Lowy Lecture on 20 June 2012.

Interview: Annmaree O'Keeffe - Australia-PNG relationship

Annmaree O'Keeffe, acting Director of The Myer Foundation Melanesia Program, was interviewed by Jemima Garrett on ABC Radio Australia on how it is time that both Papua New Guinea and Australia took stock of their bilateral relationship.

Foreign Affairs staff have a French accent

In an article in The Australian, Bernard Lane, writing on the enduring popularity of French among would-be diplomats in the Asian Century, quotes Lowy Institute Research Fellow Alex Oliver.

Interview: Alex Oliver - Melinda Taylor case

Research Fellow Alex Oliver was interviewed on ABC 702's Drive program on Foreign Minister Bob Carr's efforts in the case of Australian lawyer Melinda Taylor, who is being detained in Libya.

Farm register a step closer

Writing in The Australian Financial Review on the possibility of the Labor government implementing a new register of foreign ownership of farmland, Louise Dodson and James Massola quote the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy.

Australia exploring avenues to mend relations

Davendra Sharma, writing for Islands Business on relations between Canberra and Port Vila, quotes Annemaree O'Keeffe, acting Program Director, The Myer Foundation Melanesia Program. 

Australia cuts number of firms to pay carbon tax

Writing in Scientific American that Australia will levy a carbon tax on about half the number of companies originally expected, James Grubel quotes the Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy

Gillard, Swan urge G20 to adopt pro-growth tactics

In an article in The Australian Financial Review on Julia Gillard and Wayne Swan's call to their G20 counterparts for a medium-term global pro-growth strategy, Louise Dodson quotes Mark Thirlwell, International Economy Program Director.

When wealth becomes king, democracy is a poor subject

Writing in The Age on the Austrian thinker Joseph Schumpeter's view of capitalism as the end of a classical concept of democracy, Tim Soutphommasane quotes the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy.

China gives PNG $3bn loan for roads

In an article in The Australian on China's $3 billion soft loan to Papua New Guinea to rebuild its crumbling roads, Rowan Callick quotes Annmaree O'Keeffe, acting director of The Myer Foundation Melanesia Program.

Nuclear security work recognised in Queen’s birthday honours

Visiting Fellow John CARLSON received an award in the 2012 Queen’s birthday honours list as a member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for service to public administration, particularly in the areas of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament, and to the development of international safeguards policy.Behind those brief words lies a professional lifetime of dedication and innovative contributions to the prevention of the spread of nuclear weapons, and to nuclear security and safety.John is Australia’s foremost, and perhaps only combined policy and technical expert on nuclear non-proliferation.  He is also one of our leading arms control and disarmament experts.  In Australia, he is unique. Nobody in Australia today has made such a major, sustained, diverse, practical as well as strategic contribution to Australian and international non-proliferation efforts.  It is probably no exaggeration to say that John’s work is better recognised outside Australia than within it.John has been the respected source of apolitical, evidence based advice on these matters to all sides of politics in Australia and political systems around the globe.   He has personally contributed to a better, more effective global non-proliferation network and in the Asia-Pacific region and thus to a more secure world.John was a central figure in the international negotiations for the strengthening of the global safeguards system through the Additional Protocol to the IAEA’s safeguards system.  Australia was the first country to adopt the Additional Protocol when it was opened for signature in 1997.  It is thanks to this enhanced safeguards system that the world was able to detect the illicit Iranian nuclear activities in recent years.  John is regularly consulted by leading experts and policy makers in the United States, Russia, Republic of Korea, China, SE Asia and the world’s nuclear governing body, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). His recent retirement from the position of Director-General of the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office (ASNO) has not slowed him down; if anything he is more active than ever, pursuing his non-proliferation work and policy innovation in the Asia-Pacific region.   John is constantly looking for ways in which the system can be practically improved, not only for safeguards but also in nuclear safety and security.  John has been generous in sharing his knowledge and insights, often for no remuneration, in working to keep the world safe from nuclear proliferation while maximising the opportunities that peaceful uses of nuclear energy can offer.John is now Counselor with the Washington-based Nuclear Threat Initiative, working on the Nuclear Security Project involving George Shultz, Henry Kissinger, William Perry and Sam Nunn and other projects.  The Lowy Institute is proud to have him working with us here as a Visiting Fellow and through our own work sponsored by the Nuclear Security Project.  This is also an opportunity to congratulate Professor the Honourable Gareth John EVANS AO QC for his award of Companion in the General Division of the Order of Australia in the 2012 Queen’s birthday awards in recognition of his contribution, among other things, to arms control and disarmament.Gareth and John have worked closely together over the years, and continue to pursue their collaboration through promoting the recommendations http://icnnd.org/Reference/reports/ent/default.htmof the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament (co-chaired by Gareth Evans and for which the Lowy Institute provided research support and expertise.) _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________The Lowy Institute has a strong track record of producing original research and fostering debate on the full spectrum of nuclear issues, from arms control and security through to the future of nuclear energy. Priority topics include the future of non-proliferation and disarmament, nuclear strategic challenges in Asia, extended deterrence, the role of the civil nuclear industry in non-proliferation, and Australia’s nuclear policy dilemmas. For more information please visitour Nuclear Policy Centre.

Greg Sheridan calls Australia diminishing diplomacy 'dumb and dumber'

'Diminishing diplomacy exemplifies Australia's dumb and dumber foreign policy', 1 September 2011, p 14In a feature on the foreign policy performance of the Australian government in the Australian newspaper, Greg Sheridan describes as 'devastating' the new Lowy Institute report on Australia's diplomatic infrastructure by Alex Oliver and Andrew Shearer, 'Diplomatic disrepair: rebuilding Australia's international policy infrastructure'.You can download the full 'Diplomatic disrepair' report here.

Gillard faces revolt on economy

Greg Ansley, in an article in The New Zealand Herald on Australians' faith in the government's economic policies, quotes findings from the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll.

Democracy in doubt

John Roskam, writing in The Australian Financial Review, reports on the findings from the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on attitudes to democracy as a form of government.

Interview: Dr Michael Wesley - 2012 Lowy Institute Poll

Executive Director Michael Wesley was interviewed on SBS Ethnic Radio's World News Australia program on the findings of the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll, in particular those on foreign workers, foreign ownership of land and immigration.

Interview: Rory Medcalf - Trusting China

Rory Medcalf, Program Director International Security, was interviewed on Channel 10's The Project program on the topic 'Going global, trusting China'. The program also showed a clip of Executive Director Michael Wesley speaking about China.

Nearly 80 per cent of Australians want to re-engage with Fiji

An article on Fijilive reports that nearly 80 per cent of Australians want to re-engage with Fiji according to this year’s Lowy Institute Poll of Australian opinion.The Poll included a question asking if the government should re-engage at a ministerial level with Fiji's interim regime.Acting Head of the Lowy Institute's Melanesian Program, Annmaree O'Keefe, said the re-engagement had already begun in many ways. 

A sweet and sour Chinese problem

In an article in the Straits Times on political sentiment about China's rise, William Choong quotes results of the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy.

Support for the US alliance at high: poll

An article in The New Zealand Herald reports on the findings of the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on attitudes to the Australia-United States alliance and the rise in Chinese power in the region.

Most Australians against uranium sale to India: survey

An article in The Times of India reports that more than 60 per cent of Australians say they are against 'Australia selling uranium to India', with 39 per cent saying they are 'strongly against'," according to the eight annual Lowy Institute Poll 2012. 

Gradual approach to carbon makes sense

An article in The Australian Financial Review reports that Australians are sending a clear message that the Labor government has got its climate change policy wrong, quoting the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll which showed that they want Australia to play a reasonable part in reducing the risk of damaging global warming.

Robb backs plan to become food bowl of Asia

In an article in The Australian Financial Review, Fleur Anderson, Angela Macdonald-Smith and Louise Dodson quote findings from the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy that reveal 81 per cent of Australians were against foreign businesses buying farm land.

In thrall to the throne

Shaun Carney, writing in The Age on how our age of quick hits and summary judgments makes major change formidable, quotes the 2012 Lowy Institute annual poll of public opinion that shows that the number of Australians who want urgent and potentially costly action to combat climate change has dropped from 60 to 36 per cent since 2008.  

Come and work here if you must - just don't buy the farm

Daniel Flitton writes in The Sydney Morning Herald on the public attitudes on key international issues revealed in the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll, including the result that Australians are overwhelming happy to see foreign workers imported on temporary visas to meet labour shortages.

It either an open door or risk of war

Peter Hartcher, writing in The Sydney Morning Herald on attitudes towards foreign investment in Australia, quotes the finding of the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll that 46 per cent of Australians polled think the federal government is allowing too much foreign investment, but that jumps to 56 per cent when asked specifically about investment from China.

Negative tactics a one-way street

Geoff Kitney comments in The Australian Financial Review on findings of the 2012 Lowy Inistitute Poll on attitudes to carbon tax and climate change.

Australians reject Asian food bowl

John Kerin writes in The Australian Financial Review on the finding of the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll that 81 per cent of Australians were against foreign firms buying Australian farmland. John quotes Dr Michael Wesley, Executive Director of the Lowy Institute.

Relativism eroding faith in democracy

Rowan Callick writes in The Australian on the surprising finding of the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy that only 39 per cent of young Australians are prepared to unequivocally back democracy.

What democracy done for me lately, asks Gen Y

In an article in The Australian on the 2012 Lowy Institute Poll on public opinion and foreign policy, Rowan Callick and Sophie Gosper report on the Poll's findings on attitudes towards democracy as a form of government and quote Executive Director Michael Wesley.

Pages